An astonishing series of coincidences

A while ago, I started going to a restaurant that everyone recommended. It was pretty good, but there was one thing that always ruined the experience for me. Every time I went there, a waiter would spill a margarita on me.

Every time.

No matter when I went, whether I was alone or with others, where I sat, what I ordered, what I wore, whether or not I called ahead or just showed up, a waiter would manage to spill a margarita on me.

Every. Single. Time.

A friend of mine used to subscribe to Playboy. Every month, his issue would show up. And every month, exactly eight of the pages were printed upside down. And always the same eight pages.

Every time.

He’d rip open the packaging each month, and go thumbing through the issue. Pages 13-14, 41-42, 75-76, and 115-116.

Every. Single. Time.

My buddy used to enjoy this series of novels called “The Destroyer” series. It was an action/adventure series that had a healthy dose of political and social satire. He claimed that he so loved the series, he had large chunks of them memorized. He dared me to pick one of the books at random (there are over 130 at last count), and he would recite the first five words of chapter 2 just based on the title. And he could.

Every time.

But he knew something I didn’t: as a stylistic choice, every single book (with the exception of the first two or three) started Chapter Two with the same five words: “His name was Remo and…” Unless I had chosen one of the very first books, before the authors had settled into that pattern, he was absolutely safe in predicting the first five words of Chapter Two of any given Destroyer novel.

Every. Single. Time.

This guy managed to get himself elected president. In fact, he managed it twice. Naturally, this meant that the press wrote a lot of stories about him and his administration. And just as naturally, human nature and human fallibility being what it is, sometimes they got the stories wrong and printed things that were not as accurate as they could be. But whenever they got a story really, really wrong, it was always in the way that made this president look worse than the facts dictated.

Every time.

Story after story that had to be retracted, revised, corrected, rewritten, or just plain buried had originally been wrong in the same way: in the way that tarnished that president. They never erred in a way that benefitted him or cast him in a better light, but only in portraying him and his actions in the worst possible way.

Every. Single. Time.

Professional Friction
Concerned Reflection from The Huffington Post